02
Mar

What Is a Reverse Mortgage?

If you’re age 62 or older, own your own home, and are searching for different ways to fund your retirement, securing a reverse mortgage may be the answer for you. A reverse mortgage is a financial product that enables you to easily convert the equity.

01
Mar

How to Trade Stocks Online

Many people watch stock market reports and wonder what trading is all about. Modern technology has made it possible for anyone with a computer, sufficient funds, and positive financial history to invest in the stock market.

29
Dec

Money Market Accounts and You

Money market accounts can be an appealing way to do your banking, especially if you want to earn more interest on more than just your savings account. However, there are both pros and cons to putting your money into a money market deposit account (MMDA).

16
Nov

401K Plans

When you are searching for a new job, one of the things you should be looking for in a company is whether or not they offer a 401K plan. Why? Because a 401K is one of the best ways to save for retirement, guaranteed.

16
Nov

Index Funds and Bonds

Investing in bonds means that you are buying the debt of the issuer. It could be the debt of the U.S. government, or an affiliated body like a state or city government or borrowing authority. You can even purchase the debt of a corporation when you invest in bonds.

13
Oct

How to Settle Debt Without a Debt Consolidator

Getting back on your feet during hard times can feel downright impossible, especially when creditors and collection agencies are calling night and day wondering where their payments are.

04
Oct

Tips to Maintain Your Savings During Hard Times

Though experts say the economic crisis is over, there are many still struggling to stay afloat. Job security is still shaky, and for those of us with savings still sitting in the bank, dipping into those savings is often the only way to keep from going under.

04
Oct

A Look at Credit Card Rates Across Banks

Credit card rates used to closely track the prime rate, but they don't anymore. Card issuers, for a variety of reasons, hang on to more of the spread between the rate they pay for funds and the rates they charge.